What is the comprehensive ranking system?
The Comprehensive Ranking System(CRS) is the Government of Canada’s unique points system for ranking candidates based on a variety of factors.

Eligible candidates can submit a profile into the Express Entry pool, where they are ranked according the Comprehensive Ranking System criteria. The Government of Canada regularly issues Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence to the highest ranked candidates through draws from the pool, and aims to process applications within six months.
Do you Qualify

How are points awarded under the CRS?
Under the Comprehensive Ranking System, of twelve-hundred (1,200) possible CRS points are distributed across several factors. A candidate’s age, education, language proficiency and work experience, known as core human capital factors, are awarded a score out of 500. Some of these factors, when combined with each other, are called skill transferability factors and are considered for an additional 100 points. These 600 points constitute a candidate’s core CRS score. Points are also awarded for additional factors, such as a provincial nomination, an offer of arranged employment, prior Canadian study experience, french language ability, and a sibling who is a citizen or permanent residence in Canada. While these points are not required in order to enter, or to be selected from the Express Entry pool, they can significantly increase a candidate’s CRS score.The most valuable additional factor is a provincial nomination, which results in 600 CRS points. Many Provincial Nominee Program’s are only available to candidates in the Express Entry pool.

Can I improve my CRS score?
The beauty of the Express Entry system for candidates is that it’s dynamic. This means a candidate’s score isn’t fixed, but can be improved in many cases if the candidate is willing to put in the effort. Some areas where a candidate may be able to improve their CRS score, include:

  • Obtaining the best language scores possible;
  • Documenting their education and work experience correctly; and
  • Taking proactive steps to pursue Provincial nominee programs, Canadian jobs or new credentials.

Does my age have an impact on my CRS score?
Age is one factor that counts for points under the CRS. Age is worth up to 110 points for a single applicant or 100 points for a candidate with a spouse or common-law law partner. Maximum age points are awarded to candidates between ages 20 and 29. After the age of 45, candidates may still be eligible to submit Express Entry profiles or obtain Invitations to Apply however they are no longer awarded no CRS points for age.

Do I need an Educational Credential Evaluation(ECA) to submit an express entry profile?
An ECA is an assessment that determines the Canadian equivalent of a degree obtained outside Canada. If you have a Canadian degree, diploma or certificate, you do not need to get an ECA for that credential. An ECA is not required in order to enter the Express Entry pool as a Federal Skilled Trades Class and Canadian Experience Class candidate. However, you will need an ECA for your foreign degree, diploma or certificate if you want to be considered as a principal applicant under the Federal Skilled Worker Class. Furthermore, all candidates in the Express Entry pool who want to receive CRS points for their foreign education and / or that of their spouse or common-law partner will need to get their education assessed.

Why do rejections happen?
If the information provided by the potential candidate turns out to be false, this is known as misrepresentation and, depending on the nature and severity of the false claim, carries penalties. A potential candidate who has been found to have provided false information going into the Express Entry pool can be banned from re-entering the pool for five years. Therefore, it is hugely important to provide accurate and correct information always. Candidates who are unsure about how to assess their own abilities and credentials may want to seek advice from a Licensed immigration Consultant before entering the Express Entry pool.

How does Canada job bank and LMIA work?
The Canada Job Bank is an online search engine for open job positions across Canada. It helps match candidates with Canadian employers and jobs based on their skills, knowledge, and experience. Under Express Entry, candidates may register with the Job Bank if they do not already have a Canadian job offer or a Provincial/Territorial nomination. As of June 6, 2017, registration in the Job Bank is voluntary.

If a candidate is currently working in Canada on a Labour Market Impact Assessment-based work permit, he or she will not have to reapply for a new LMIA, insofar as the LMIA is still valid. Should the Express Entry candidate choose to apply to a job opportunity, the recipient employer will then be required to go through their usual interview or assessment process. If the employer finds that the Express Entry candidate meets their needs, and they are eligible to hire a foreign national, they can offer them a job. Employers with a positive LMIA will then provide this information along with a job offer letter to the candidate to include in their Express Entry profile. A Canadian job offer awards points under the Comprehensive Ranking System(CRS), and consequently may increase a candidate’s chances of receiving an Invitation to Apply(ITA) for permanent residence in a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

Eligible candidates can submit a profile into the Express Entry pool, where they are ranked according the Comprehensive Ranking System criteria. The Government of Canada regularly issues Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence to the highest ranked candidates through draws from the pool, and aims to process applications within six months.

What does Invitation to Apply (ITA) mean?
An Invitation to Apply(ITA) is offered to any candidate in the Express Entry pool who has been selected to apply for immigration to Canada by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). A candidate who receives an ITA will have meet the requirements in one of IRCC’s draws from the pool. This includes meeting the minimum Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) cut-off threshold for that draw.

Does a candidate need to have a job offer to apply for express entry?
Not necessarily, though the fact that Canadian employers play a greater role in Canadian immigration under Express Entry than they did previously means that, for many candidates, obtaining a valid job offer from a Canadian employer significantly increases their chances of being invited to apply for Canadian permanent residence. Candidates in the Express Entry pool have the opportunity to increase their chances of being invited to apply by promoting themselves directly to employers through the Canadian job bank.

Is the English language test mandatory for candidates?
Yes, all candidates need to take a language test in order to determine their language abilities. There are a set number of points available for language ability for each of the economic immigration programs that come under Express Entry, and ability must be proven by candidates taking a standardized language test approved by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC, formerly known as CIC). The most popular are IELTS, CELPIP for English and TEF or TCF Canada for French.

As part of their Express Entry profile, candidates must submit valid language test results obtained in the past two years. Once a candidate enters the Express Entry pool, he or she can earn extra points and increase his or her rank by taking another language test and obtaining better results. As of June 6, 2017, additional points are also available to candidates who prove French language ability in addition to English language ability.

How long does a candidate profile remain in the Express Entry pool?
Each profile remains in the Express Entry pool for a period of 12 months or until an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residence is issued, whichever comes first. If after 12 months a candidate wishes to remain in the pool, he or she may create a fresh profile.

Why hire a Licensed Immigration Consultant?
Candidates are not required to hire an immigration representative in order to participate in Express Entry. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC, formerly known as CIC) has determined, however, that authorized immigration representatives may assist candidates during all stages of the Express Entry immigration process. With over 10 years of success, consultant Raji Rao and her professional team at Hindcana can help candidates immigrate to Canada by:

  • Helping to prepare an accurate application going into the pool, lessening the risk of misrepresentation and the associated penalties;
  • Providing job alerts related to the candidate’s occupation and promoting the candidate to Canadian employers. This increases his or her chances of landing a skilled job and being invited to apply for permanent residency; and
  • Reviewing all supporting documents, submitting an application within the time frame set by the government of Canada, and tracking it all the way while communicating with the government on the candidate’s behalf. Potential candidates can fill out a Consultation Form today and maximize their chances of success in immigrating to Canada under the Express Entry immigration selection system.

What are the minimum eligibility requirements for candidates under the Federal Skilled Worker Class?
To be eligible for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa under the Skilled Worker category, candidates must:

  • Have at least one year of continuous full-time, or equivalent, paid work experience in the past 10 years in a skilled occupation (National Occupational Classification skill level 0, A or B); or
  • Qualify for Arranged Employment with a LMIA; or
  • Have completed a PhD from a recognized institution in Canada; or
  • Have completed two years of study at a recognized institution in Canada towards a PhD;

Candidates must also:

  • Have settlement funds for settlement in Canada; and
  • Pass a minimum threshold of language ability for one of Canada’s two official languages (English/French).

In addition, Canada Federal Skilled Worker (Professional) applicants must attain at least 67 points based on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s (IRCC, formerly CIC) six immigration selection factors.

Finally, all applicants and their accompanying and non-accompanying dependents, under all categories of Canadian Immigration, must satisfy Canadian health and security/criminality requirements.

Is there an eligible occupations list?
There is no eligible occupations list in place at this time. Applicants need to have at least one year of work experience in the past 10 years in a National Occupational Classification (NOC) code type A, B or 0.

What are the required documents for the Federal Skilled Worker Class?
Under the Federal Skilled Worker category, an applicant must submit the following, in support of his or her application:

  • Appropriate application forms, signed and completed;
  • Appropriate Canadian government processing fees;
  • Identity and civil status documents;
  • Travel documents and passports;
  • Evidence of education training/professional qualifications;
  • Evidence of work experience;
  • IELTS or CELPIP and/or TEF or TCF Canada results or;
  • Canadian educational credential assessment;
  • Evidence of Arranged Employment, if applicable;
  • Evidence of points claimed, if any, under the adaptability factor;
  • Police certificates and clearances;
  • Proof of settlement funds.

All candidates who receive an invitation to apply are also required to submit the following supporting documents along with their e-application:

  • Valid passport
  • Birth certificate
  • Language test results
  • Documentation attesting to work experience
  • Police clearance certificate(s)
  • Upfront medical receipt
  • Photographs of principal applicant and family members

It is important to note that many Canadian Immigration Visa Offices have their own specific document requirements that must be respected in order to avoid having an application returned, delayed or even refused.

Is work experience a requirement?
Work experience is a critical requirement for a Federal Skilled Worker candidate. At a minimum, a candidate must have one year of full-time (or the part-time equivalent) of continuous work experience in an occupation at a skill level recognized by IRCC. Accumulated part-time work experience is acceptable.

Do candidates need to attend an interview?

Applicants for a Canada Immigration Visa under the Skilled Worker category may be required to attend a personal interview with a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer. Such interviews are held to ensure the information in the application is accurate, to clear up any uncertainties and to verify information.

Canadian Immigration Visa Officers may, under all categories of immigration, grant an interview waiver, depending on the qualifications of the applicant, the quality of the supporting documentation, and the overall credibility of the applicant.

Applications that are complete in every detail increase the chances of an interview waiver. Interview waivers, however, are granted at the discretion of the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer in charge of a candidate’s file. It is not possible to apply specifically for a waiver. Even if an interview is waived, the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer reserves the right to call a candidate to an interview at a later date.

Does a candidate attain more points if a close relative is present in Canada?

Yes, a candidate will be awarded points under the Adaptability Factor if he or she, or his or her accompanying spouse or common-law partner, has a close relative who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident and who is currently residing in Canada. To qualify as a close relative, the Canadian citizen or permanent resident must be a child, mother or father, brother or sister, aunt or uncle, niece or nephew, grandchild or grandparent.

What are the eligibility requirements under the Canadian Experience Class program?

An individual applying for permanent residence under the Canadian Experience Class must be a foreign worker who has accumulated a minimum of one year of full-time skilled work experience in Canada within the past 36 months. He or she must also intend to settle outside of the Province of Quebec. CEC applications are processed through the Express Entry immigration selection system, and applicants must receive an invitation to apply before they may make an application.

Does a candidates work experience need to be related to their field of education?
For international graduates, work experience does not have to be related to education, as long as the candidate has accumulated the work experience after graduating from an approved Canadian post-secondary educational institution.

Can a candidate qualify with a one-year degree or diploma program from a Canadian Accredited school?
When considering education, all candidates must have acquired at least two years of academic study in Canada and must have graduated from an approved Canadian post-secondary educational institution to qualify for the Canadian Experience Class. There is, however an exception to this rule. A candidate would still be eligible for the Canadian Experience Class in the event that he or she has completed a one-year Master’s degree after completing another program that is one year in length and from an approved Canadian post-secondary educational institution. The programs must be completed within two years.

Can a candidate apply directly for Permanent Residence under the Canadian Experience Class Program?

As of January 1, 2015, candidates who are eligible under the Canadian Experience Class must make an expression of interest in immigrating to Canada permanently through the Express Entry immigration selection system. Candidates are not able to apply directly to the program. If they are selected from the Express Entry pool and issued an invitation to apply, they may then submit an application for permanent residence.

Do English or French as second-language courses count towards education requirement for CEC program?
No, English- or French-as-a-second language courses do not count toward education requirements under the Canadian Experience Class. However, if a candidate’s education in Canada includes a second language component, that education can be counted provided that the second language component does not make up more than half of the course load.

Anim pariatur cliche reprehenderit, enim eiusmod high life accusamus terry richardson ad squid. 3 wolf moon officia aute, non cupidatat skateboard dolor brunch. Food truck quinoa nesciunt laborum eiusmod. Brunch 3 wolf moon tempor, sunt aliqua put a bird on it squid single-origin coffee nulla assumenda shoreditch et. Nihil anim keffiyeh helvetica, craft beer labore wes anderson cred nesciunt sapiente ea proident. Ad vegan excepteur butcher vice lomo.

Which provinces in Canada participate in the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP)?

The following provinces participate in the Provincial Nominee Program:

  • Alberta
  • British Columbia
  • Manitoba
  • New Brunswick
  • Newfoundland And Labrador
  • Northwest Territories
  • Nova Scotia
  • Ontario
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Saskatchewan
  • Yukon

Is Provincial Nomination a requirement for Express Entry in Canada?
No

What is the benefit of obtaining a Provincial Nomination?
A Provincial Nomination means that your application for a Canada Immigration Visa will be processed quickly and it provides another way of qualifying for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa apart from the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration.

How is the Provincial Nominee Program linked with the Express Entry Program?

Provinces and territories are able to nominate a certain number of candidates through the Express Entry system to meet local and provincial labour market needs. These portions of the PNPs are known as “enhanced” nominations.

Candidates in the Express Entry pool who obtain an enhanced nomination from a province are awarded 600 points under the Comprehensive Ranking System, out of a possible total of 1,200. When these additional points are added to a candidate’s human capital and skills transferability points, it will result in an invitation to apply for permanent residence at a subsequent draw from the Express Entry pool.

All candidates must meet the eligibility criteria of one of the following federal economic immigration programs in order to enter and be selected from the Express Entry pool:

  • Federal Skilled Worker (FSW)
  • Federal Skilled Trades (FST)
  • Canadian Experience Class (CEC)

Provinces and territories may add additional criteria for their own immigration streams.

Depending on the province, candidates eligible to enter the Express Entry pool may either enter the pool first and then be nominated by a province or territory, or be nominated by a province or territory before completing an online Express Entry profile and entering the Express Entry pool.

Does Provincial Nomination guarantee Permanent Residence?
No. IRCC must be satisfied that a Provincial Nominee meets statutory requirements — health, security and authenticity of documents — before issuing a Canada Immigration Visa.

What do the provinces look for in their Nominee candidates?
Most provinces are looking for individuals who will contribute to the province’s economic growth, and are willing to settle in that province. Criteria that provinces take into consideration may include the following:

  • Job offer in the province
  • Education
  • Work experience in critical industries
  • English and/or French language skills
  • Close relations in that province
  • Ability to adapt to life in that province

What is the procedure to study in Canada?

The first step is to get admission to a Canadian Designated Learning Institution (DLI) recognized by the government of Canada. Once an individual receives a letter of acceptance from a DLI, he or she may be able to apply for a study permit. Applications may be made online or by mail.

All new study permits are issued at a Canadian port of entry. An applicant who has submitted an application to a foreign Canadian Visa Office will be issued a letter of approval advising him or her to travel to a Canadian port of entry to have the study permit issued. A study permit is generally issued for the duration of the person’s studies.

Does a candidate need to show proof of funds for a study permit?
Canada study permit applicants need to prove they have sufficient funds to cover tuition fees, and financial capacity to support living expenses for the first year of study. This table shows minimum funds required to support yourself as a student and family members who come with you to Canada:

  • Single applicant : Tuition + $10000 (for a period of 12 months) or $833/month
  • One additional family member :  $4,000 for a 12-month period (or $333 per month)
  • Every additional family member :  $3,000 for a 12-month period per dependent child of any age (or $255 per month)

Is IELTS or CELPIP a requirement for study permits?
Please note that most Canadian Universities and colleges may require IELTS or proof of language proficiency in order to gain admission. However, please note that this is an admission requirement and not a requirement for a Canadian Study Permit unless applying through the Student Partner Program. Therefore, it is advisable that you verify with the academic institution you wish to attend to determine if IELTS is required and the scores needed.

Is it possible to work during study in Canada?

An international student may be eligible to work while studying in Canada. A student must have a valid study permit and be enrolled full-time at a Designated Learning Institution (DLI). Study permit holders may be allowed to work for up to 20 hours per week during regular academic sessions and full time during scheduled breaks. To work “on-campus” a student must meet the following criteria listed on this page.

In order to work “off-campus”, a study permit must be authorized for off-campus work by a visa officer. If you are enrolled in a full-time academic, professional or vocational training program at a designated learning institution, you may be eligible to work “off-campus” without a work permit. However, it should be printed on the study permit that you are authorized to work off-campus.

An international student must stop working the day they no longer meet the eligibility requirements. There is an important exemption to this regulation: students enrolled in an English as a Second Language (ESL) or French as a Second Language (FSL) program are not authorized to work with a study permit.

What happens after graduating from a Canadian Academic Institution?

Canadian immigration policy offers international students many ways to stay and settle in the country after graduation. A popular option available to international students after graduation is the possibility for an open work permit under the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWPP). Under the PGWPP, an individual who has studied full-time at a participating Designated Learning Institution (DLI) may be eligible to apply for a PGWP.

Gaining work experience in Canada after graduation may help you qualify for permanent residence in Canada through a variety of immigration available immigration programs. For more information on PGWP eligibility criteria. Generally, if a PGWP is issued, it is for the same duration as the applicant’s studies for a minimum of eight months and a maximum of three years.

Can a spouse be included in an applicant’s study permit?

A spouse or common-law partner of a valid study permit holder, who is enrolled full-time at a qualified post-secondary institution, may be eligible to apply for an open work permit.  The open work permit for a spouse or common-law partner may be valid for the same period of time as the study permit, and as long as the study permit remains valid. In the study permit application, the applicant should indicate that the spouse will accompany him or her to Canada. If a spouse later decides to study in Canada, he or she should submit his or her own study permit application.

For an accompanying spouse to be considered eligible for an open work permit, the study permit holder must be enrolled full-time at a degree-granting post-secondary institution. Eligible post-secondary institutions include:

  • Public post-secondary institution, such as a college or university, or CEGEP in Quebec;
  • Private college-level school in Quebec; and
  • Canadian private school that can legally award degrees under provincial law.

How does a study permit help a candidate in their immigration process ?

Education in Canada may offer international students a route to Canadian permanent residence. There are a range of federal and provincial programs available for international students to apply for immigration, and in some cases, this can be done without a job offer. Canadian education and work experience award those who are eligible additional points in the federal Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking System.

Who is eligible for a Post Graduate Work Permit (PGWP)?

To be eligible for a Post-Graduation Work Permit, an international student must:

  • Be 18 or older;
  • Have continuously studied full-time in Canada in a study program at least eight months long;
  • Have a document from your school (transcript, official letter, certificate, etc.) that confirms you completed and passed all your program requirements;
  • Have graduated from a:
    • Public post-secondary school, such as a college, trade/technical school or university, or CEGEP in Quebec or
    • Private post-secondary school that operates under the same rules as public schools (currently applies only to certain private post-secondary institutions in Quebec) or
    • Private secondary or post-secondary school (in Quebec) that offers qualifying programs of 900 hours or longer, leading to a diplôme d’études professionnelles (DEP) or an attestation de spécialisation professionnelle (ASP) or
    • Canadian private school that can legally award degrees under provincial law (for example, Bachelors, Masters or Doctorate degree) but only if you are enrolled in a study programs leading to a degree as authorized by the province.
  • Apply for a work permit within 90 days of when it was confirmed that you completed your program; and
  • Have a valid study permit when you apply for the work permit.

How long does a PGWP get issued for?
The PGWP may be issued for a maximum of three years, depending on the length of the graduate’s program of study in Canada. For example, if the study program was one year in duration, the PGWP will usually be issued for the same length of time (i.e. if a candidate’s study program was 12 months, the PGWP would be valid for 12 months). If, however, study program was two years or more in duration, a PGWP may be issued for up to three years.

Three years is the maximum duration of a PGWP. The permit cannot be valid for longer than the length of the program of study completed in Canada.

What education credentials are eligible for a PGWP? Which institutions are eligible for PGWP?

A candidate must also meet all the eligibility criteria for the PGWP program. In addition, a candidate must hold a diploma or degree from one of the following institutions to be eligible for a PGWP:

  • A public post-secondary institution, such as a college, trade/technical school, university or CEGEP (in Quebec);
  • A private post-secondary institution that operates under the same rules and regulations as public institutions;
  • A private secondary or post-secondary institution (in Quebec) offering qualifying programs of 900 hours or longer leading to a diplôme d’études professionnelles (DEP, in English Diploma of Vocational Studies, or DVS) or an attestation de spécialisation professionnelle(Attestation of Professional Specialisation, ASP); or
  • A Canadian private institution authorized to grant degrees if the student is enrolled in one of the programs of study leading to a degree, as authorized by the province

What is a bridging open work permit?
If you are awaiting a decision on your Canada Experience Class (CEC) application and your post-graduation work permit is about to expire, you may be able to apply for a bridging open work permit.

Bridging open work permits allow qualified applicants whose work permits are about to expire (within four months or less) to keep working while they wait for a final decision on their permanent residence application.

What is Canadian Business Class?

The Canadian Business Class is a category of Canadian Immigration under which individuals with business/managerial experience and relatively high net-worth may qualify for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa. There are three sub-categories within the Business Class: Immigrant Investors, Entrepreneurs and Self-Employed Persons.

Note :

  • The Federal Investor Program was terminated on June 19, 2014.  
  •  The Immigrant investor Venture Capital Pilot Program is temporarily closed and is not accepting new applications at this time. 
  •  The Federal Entrepreneur Program is on hold until further notice. 

How can a person qualify under the self-employed category?

To qualify as a Self-Employed person, you must be able to demonstrate experience, intention and ability to establish or purchase a business in Canada that will keep you employed and make a significant contribution to cultural activities, athletics or farming in Canada. Your intended business must generate sufficient revenues to support you and your dependents.

If your destination is in the Province of Quebec, you must have:

  • A net worth of at least CAD$100,000, lawfully obtained; and
  • At least two years of experience as a self-employed worker in the occupation you plan to pursue in the Province of Quebec.

Under the Quebec Selection Criteria, your field of activity is not limited to culture, athletics or farming.

What is the net worth requirement for a self-employed persons?
The net worth requirement for Self-Employed persons varies depending on the nature and location of the proposed venture. Self-Employed persons destined to the Province of Quebec must have a net worth of at least CAD$100,000, lawfully obtained.

What are the different ways to move from the U.S. to Canada?

There are many ways to immigrate to Canada or to reside in Canada temporarily. Every year, thousands of U.S. citizens and residents move to Canada as workers, students, or permanent residents.

  • Canadian permanent residence

Permanent resident status allows an individual to live in, work in and enjoy Canada on a permanent basis, with no time limitation to the status and no restriction on movement within the labour market. Broadly speaking, there are three categories of immigration programs that lead to permanent residence: economic programs (for skilled workers and business persons), family reunification programs (for spouses, common-law partners, parents, grandparents and dependent children of Canadian citizens and permanent residents), and refugee/humanitarian programs. U.S. citizens are unlikely to be successful through the latter category (see question 19).

  • To learn more about your Canadian immigration options through the economic programs, fill out a free assessment form.
  • For individuals who have a close family member who is a citizen or permanent resident of Canada, as well as individuals who have a Canadian spouse or common-law partner, please complete this free Family Class assessment form to learn more about your options.
  • Temporary residence in Canada

Many U.S. citizens and residents choose to come to Canada on a temporary basis, and many go on to pursue permanent residence. U.S.-based workers enjoy certain benefits due to the close trade relationship between the U.S. and Canada (see question 10), while students may pursue further education in Canada — quality institutions and cheaper tuition costs are just two of the incentives. In addition, U.S. citizens can come to visit Canada, typically being granted the right to travel around the country for up to six months per entry.

Can I bring my family to Canada?

In general, U.S. citizens moving to Canada may bring accompanying family members. However, the specifics depend on the status you may be seeking in Canada.

  • Short-term visitors (i.e. less than six months)
  • International students
  • Work permit holders
  • Permanent residents

It is best to review which type of entry to Canada you wish to undertake, then look into the options for bringing family members.

Can a person be internally transferred to an affiliate company in Canada?

Many foreign workers in Canada are working as an intra-company transferee. This means that the worker has been transferred by his or her employer to work in a parent, a subsidiary, a branch, or an affiliate of that enterprise in Canada. There are provisions under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that allow intra-company transferees from the U.S. to work in Canada.

Transferees must have at least one year of full-time work experience with the foreign enterprise and be coming to Canada to perform comparable work for the Canadian affiliate. Work in Canada must fall under one of three categories:

  • Executive
    • An employee who primarily directs the management of the enterprise or a major component thereof.
  • Senior Managerial
    • An employee who manages all or part of the enterprise and supervises/controls the work of other managers or professional employees.
  • Specialized Knowledge
    • An employee who can demonstrate specialized knowledge of the enterprise’s product or service or an advanced level of expertise in the enterprise’s processes and procedures.

In order for the foreign worker to receive a work permit, the Canadian business will have to demonstrate a qualifying relationship with its foreign counterpart, as well as a qualifying relationship with its employee.

What are the tax consequences for moving to Canada from the U.S.?
Canada and the U.S. have a Tax Treaty that, for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income and on capital, should make relocating to Canada as smooth a process as possible. While one of the primary differences between the two countries is that Canadian income tax laws are based on residency (while U.S. tax laws are based on citizenship), the Tax Treaty between Canada and U.S.A. has several mechanisms available known as foreign tax credits, to make sure the person does not have to pay duplicate taxes to both countries.

What is the standard of health care in Canada?

Canada has a public health care system that makes critical care accessible to all Canadian citizens and permanent residents alike, as well as certain temporary residents. When it comes to the administration of health care, the U.S. and Canada are quite different. Though the health care system in Canada is actually a number of sub-systems run by the provincial ministries of health, the federal government sets the standards for health care across the country.

With American education, does a person still need to do an English Language Test?
Yes, if you wish to immigrate to Canada through an economic program, you need to prove your language ability. The points outlined in the above question apply, even if you have lived, worked, and/or studied in English for many years.

Yes. Fees are payable to the Canadian government as follows:

Federal Skilled Worker Class Application ($CAD)

Principal applicant – $550

  • Spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner of the principal applicant, or where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who is 22 or older – $550
  • A family member of the principal applicant who is under 19 and is not a spouse or common-law partner, or is 19 or older who has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 19, due to a physical or mental condition – $150

Note: The government of Canada has outlined a plan to increase the maximum age of dependent children that may be included on an immigration application to less than 22 years of age. This page will be updated when further news is announced.

  • Where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who:
    • Is under 22 years of age, unmarried and not in a common-law relationship, or
    • Is 22 years of age or older and has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 22, due to a physical or mental condition

– $150
Canadian Business Class Application ($CAD)

  • Principal applicant – $1,050
  • Spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner of the principal applicant, or where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who is 22 or older – $550
  • A family member of the principal applicant who is under 19 and is not a spouse or common-law partner, or is 19 or older who has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 19, due to a physical or mental condition – $150

Note: The government of Canada has outlined a plan to increase the maximum age of dependent children that may be included on an immigration application to less than 22 years of age. This page will be updated when further news is announced.

  • Where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who:
    • Is under 22 years of age, unmarried and not in a common-law relationship, or
    • Is 22 years of age or older and has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 22, due to a physical or mental condition

– $150

Family Class Application ($CAD)

  • Sponsorship application (per application) – $75
  • Principal applicant – $475
  • Principal applicant, if under 19 and not a spouse or common-law partner (including a dependent child of the sponsor, a child to be adopted, and an orphaned brother, sister, niece, nephew, or grandchild) – $75
  • Spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner of the principal applicant or, where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who is 22 or older -$550
  • A family member of the principal applicant who is under 19 and is not a spouse or common-law partner, or is 19 or older who has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 19, due to a physical or mental condition – $150

Note: The government of Canada has outlined a plan to increase the maximum age of dependent children that may be sponsored to less than 22 years of age. This page will be updated when further news is announced.

  • Where a transitional provision applies, a family member of the principal applicant who:
    • Is under 22, unmarried, and not in a common-law relationship, or
    • Is 22 or older and has been unable to be financially self-supporting since before the age of 22, due to a physical or mental condition

-$150

Additionally, all principal applicants and all spouses/common-law partners must pay a Right of Permanent Residence Fee (RPRF) of CAD $490.

Fees are subject to change at any time. Additional government fees apply for applicants destined to the province of Quebec and under certain Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) streams.

When are the government fees payable?
Canadian government fees must be submitted concurrently with your Canadian Immigration Application and are refundable at any time before assessment of the application by a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer has begun. If any provincial fees are required they are payable at the time that your application is submitted to the province. The Right of Permanent Residence Fee may be paid at any time prior to the issuance of your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa and is refundable if, for any reason, you do not become a Canadian Permanent Resident.

In what currency are the fees payable?
Canadian dollars (CAD)

What is the Right of Permanent Resident fee (RPRF)?
The principal applicant and accompanying spouse/common law partner must pay this fee at any time before their Canada Immigration Visa is issued. At this time, the RPRF is set at CAD $490. The RPRF is fully refundable if for any reason the principal applicant or accompanying spouse/common law partner do not land in Canada as permanent residents.

Are all the fees payable even for inland applications ( candidates currently present in Canada)?
Yes.

Are there any additional fees?
You can expect to pay fees related to medical examinations and, if required, to the notarization and/or the translation of documents into French or English.

Additionally, the Federal Skilled Worker Class requires applicants to have their foreign educational credentials assessed for Canadian equivalency by a designated Canadian accreditation body.

What are the application fees for a Post Graduate Work Permit?
The current total fee for a PGWP is $255 CAD. This is comprised of two parts: $155 CAD is the work permit fee, and $100 CAD for the Open Work Permit Holder fee.